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. if you work 20 years in america, paid into social security, on someone else's number and you can prove it, not worth anything. .. must present a government i.d. with a photo. the employer enters this into a computer in the e-verify system and watches for the photograph to come up. if the official government photograph for that name doesn't match the one that they have in their hand, you can't be hired. so this is going to make the work place a lot tougher and any employer who hires someone who doesn't match up, they're subject to fines an penalties. and finally, i think it was hector who told the story about overstaying a visitors visa. 40% of the undocumented people in america overstayed their visas, visitors, tourists whatever they may be. we'll have a system under this law that will track people not only as they come in on visas but as they leave on visas. this is a tough enforcement bill and those who say it isn't haven't taken a look at it. when it comes to the border, i will tell you something i had to grit my teeth as they put another 700 miles of fence and billion dollars on the b
to the role that america has played in that region for a long time. now, it's important that people know that, to get your point, because it's important for people understand what we're doing, why we're doing it, to understand first of all that our alliances are strong and we stand behind our alliances. second, that we are not picking a fight with anyone. we are not trying to militarize a situation there. we would like what has been happening in decades past to keep going. democracy has been spreading across -- prosperity has been spreading to a huge economic and political development and a part of world without any conflict at all. so that's the fight that we have on the pivot and that's why we're doing it and that's why we're saying what we're doing. nobody it's the wrong idea by the duty provided the of why we're doing it spent we only had a couple of minutes left and mechanical of our time because the to the invoke year is they put us on planes and send us back. we will take two questions. kimberly and no here. we'll take a cu key and then you can pick which one you're answering. >> you m
of providing care to everything in america, not only will you not get care tomorrow, we'll take the dollars you use to get care today, and the supreme court said that was an outrageous use of federal power. seems like there's lots of examples in the history, and in our present of using the tax code to treat some people in some states differently than we do people in other state, and to use the affordable care act as a hammer, not an approach, but the stick. did you consider those things -- do you agree with my analysis of those two circumstances as they exist today, and did you consider those in the analysis that you performed? congressman, yes, we are aware of the provisions that you -- >> the stick approach opposed to the cater approach. >> as i said in the review of the legislative history, the floor debates, there's no evidence that there was any discussion of the carrot stick approach in connection with the premium tax credits. >> okay. but it is consistent with past irs practice to treat folks in some states differently than we treat folks in other states based on statute? only those with
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural, political and education issues. he's the senior pfizer to project lead the way and on the advisory board of -- a chief education adviser to be in stock innovation. he is taught at boston university the university of texas at harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. it was the author of more than 24 books including to new york times number one bestsellers and the host of the old bennett's morning in america and has received more than 30 honorary degrees and as a final note a very long time ago bill and i were philosophy students together at williams college. bill will speak in a minute. he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of "is college worth it?." david is the associate producer of the nationally syndicated bill bennett's morning in america and a contributor to the manhattan institute's higher education policy blog and at claremont institute fellow and studied greek and latin at the catholic university in washi
, and the schools, no account teachers, and let's bring in teach for america clubs, open up charter schools in the district, and that's the model, the idea that's been propagated for the last decade plus under republican administration and a democratic administration. it is just the latest in a series of silver bullets overredded up, and you can just change the structure and everything else changes, but i think what union city teaches is -- or reminds us that -- is that there are a handful of time-tested, well-proven, well-established game changing strategies the school district can be done, and i'll say a word about that in a minute. why write about it? people forgot or took it for granted. it is almost like platitude, and any incompetenter with -- educator with a pulse will nod their head and say, sure. the trick is actually going from saying, yeah, that's a great idea to making it happen. in union city, you start with amazing preschool systems, and i know you are here someplace or another. where are you, suzie? [applause] i spent a fair amount of time in your class, and i walked in there
today for different reason. we had the same in latin america. people my grated to vens with a lay from countries such as peru on a consistent basis for half a century. it's a wealthier country than venezuela. look at it this way as well. chinese immigration in the united states has played a key role in the growing economic prosperity of china, they have not only of course been able to export stuff and import stuff to them. they invested in china response i think that borders and barriers are really art initial term of the impact on the economy. we all benefit from the constant circulation as people. the same is happening in europe. some of the eastern -- or central european countries have been -- in the last few years. it became legal to do so. and yet they have been becoming more and more prosperous. poland is more prosperous. it export the an incredible amount of people to spain. >> i have some small things to add. he's 100% right. about the german 1848ers. they left behind complained about the liberals leaving. americans who experienced and met them complained about the autocratic g
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
ring and if america is to be a great nation this must become true so let freedom ring let freedom ring. from the mighty mountain to new york let freedom ring from pennsylvania. not only that but let freedom ring from the resort. let freedom ring from the lookout mountain of tennessee. let freedom ring from every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery
, it is a scandal. but if it came up in the of the context that you raised first, it's just part of life in america. >> ladies and gentlemen, on that note, floyd has kindly agreed to sign his book. again, critics have given it an incredible review, and it's just a breathtaking book. i've read and it's breathtaking. i would strongly urge you to have your book signed by floyd but if you could just remain seated for about 20 seconds. my last question to float, could you tell us if the society for challenge into getting and the supreme court questioning? [laughter] >> certainly much more relaxing. >> actually. on outlook know, ladies and gentlemen, please join me in thanking one of the most brilliant scholars and lawyers that this nation has had that has impacted many of our lives on a regular basis. thank you. [applause] >> you are watching tv on c-span2. 48 hours of nonfiction authors and books every weekend. >> up next, booktv's peter slen into his office and one. this weaknesses concludes with military historian antony beevor followed by victorian era expert judith flanders. antony beevor talked ab
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural political and educational issues. he's a senior at visor at project lead the way and on the advisory board of audacity.com and chief education advisor to -- he has taught at boston university university of texas and harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. that was the author of more than 24 books including two "new york times" number one bestsellers and a host of bill bennett's morning in america has received more than three honorary degrees bill and i were philosophy students together to bill will speak in a minute and he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of kathleen tighe. david is the associate producer of the ashley syndicated bill bennett's morning in america contributor to mining the campus a policy blog. in his honor i tried to come up with an opiate let end quote addressing student debt and i suggest -- that is happy is he who has no debt. [laughter] >> that's good. [laughter] we look forward to your pres
between black and white perceptions. he is the measure of the alienation of black america from white america so he knows if he is outrageous and people attack him there will be a tendency to support him because he is now being beleaguered by the very people who are being viewed as the people who are oppressing. he would make these outrageous comments and he would be attacked by everyone and he would come in town without a single bit of advertising and draw people to a rally because people were rallying around the attacked brother. it's much the same in the arab world. when saddam hussein was making bold and outrageous comments he was praying on the alienation and frustration and anger of people who feel that their histories out of control, that they are being beleaguered by the west, that they have no ability to shape their destiny. and so here's this guy standing up and defending him. james baker understood that. in 1991 he spoke before a congressional testimony and said why don't we do this and why do we do that? james baker said understand what saddam is doing is praying on arab a
, and what i often call apartheid in the southern part of the united states of america. so if you look at was going on from 1876 to 1895, in that 20 year period we saw the beginning of the end of full citizenship of african-americans in this country. so by the time robert smalls died in 1950, he died brokenhearted, and financially, not near as well off as he once was. and so i have spent a lot of time talking about the history of this. as i used to say to my students when i taught, if it happened before it can happen again. and we see all the speculation about what the supreme court is going to do with the most important civil rights act, which i think was the voting rights act of 1965. and most experts think that that's about to come to a significant, and i call, a noble end. oh grams of affirmative action, that simply means you're going to take positive steps. you can't be passive. you've got to take positive steps to overcome the current effects of past discrimination, the history. not going to happen by itself. if you bring that to a close, and people are speculating that that is a
shouted back no america, america. i had thrown my passport at them i was born in washington d.c.. they would kick me in the stomach when i would get my breath back and as others join the firing squad i would say america, america. at some point they take the guns from our heads we believe because we were from the same country. they would have to pay a price for killing us that they would never have to pay for killing them. a red cross jeep pulled up and the driver of the red cross jeep picked up this old man who was in a sewer ditch next to us. every time the soldiers beat him he would put up his hands and a prayer sign and they would smash the buts of their rifles into his face. we drove off to a hospital and they stopped us to get away from us and we drove as a human mouse to the hospital. they hung off the top of the ge. at the hospital the doctors and nurses started to cry when they saw us. not because we were in worship and the people. that we were being dragged there. i think because of what we have represented. not just allen and i but i think americans. not just timor b
reporters discuss their book "whitey bulger: america's most wanted gangster and the man hunt that brought him to justice." , the trialgan -- began june 12, 2013. [applause] >> thank you for coming out on such a beautiful day. we don't get a lot of those here. i'm with the chicago tribune, write a business column with kevin and shelly murphy of the boston globe who are here not to do scouting on the chicago black hawks. [laughter] but to talk about their new book on whitey bulger, the boston mobster caught on the lamb after, what, 16 years, and first of all, let's get -- you guys have been boston journalists for quite a long time at this point. >> somebody said between us it's, like, what, 16 years? yeah, we've been chasing him combined total for 25 -- i mean, 25 each, so 50 between us. >> wow. i was reminded in the beginning, when i was a kid, my father was taking a friend of mine to go see butch cassidy and the sun dance kid. he said, you know, remember, whatever the movie makes of them, they are the bad guys, and the other thing that it reminded me of was the old line from mel brooke in
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
to working on that and have an immigration bill that will really work for iowa and for america. [applause] .. >> businesses get it and now how important it is for the vitality of america and endorsed by the afl-cio, so labor understands it also. we thank both labor and business community for supporting the immigration bill. [applause] so, nick, you've been involved in ufcw, packing house workers and stuff, and it's been my experience as i toured them, and i didn't work in them like durbin did. he was a meat cutter in packing houses, but as i've traveled around, i see more and more of the latino community working in our packing houses and meat cutting places you represent. tell us about that. >> i'm with local cw222 from northwest iowa. we have a packing house in cherokee, iowa, and dakota city, nebraska. too-- together, that's roughly close to 5,000 employee, and 75% of them are latino. >> 75%? >> yes, yes, so 75% of the membership who we represent are latino and immigrant workers, so, again, good morning, ladies and gentlemen, of the panel and audience, senators, i'm honored to be here t
in that he believed that business in america should serve some point. there should be an and the business. it didn't message you have to have a broad social and that there should be some point to it, which automatically testing wishes and for most of our business folks from today. he had kind of an enlightened sense of what this is journalism could be about. >> he didn't mind criticism of business. >> that's right. let's face it, when it's 1933 and its 1934, it's kind of hard to defend business. he had a henry hoover conception of heroic business, but in the early part of the depression it was almost impossible for any honest person to continue to take that line. so fortune and its writers including agee begin to confront some of the more unseemly side of the country. so fortune ran pieces about -- they ran a piece about the tennessee valley authority, which agee wrote and which luce told him was told there was one of the best things i've ever been printed since fortune had been around. so they were brought and pragmatically open to new deal reforms. and i keep mentioning dwight macdonald
.m. eastern here on cing span 3. c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your it's provider -- by your television provider. >> host: and this week on "the communicators," gordon smith who is president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters, our guest reporter is paul kirby of telecommunications report. senator smith, you started at nab nearly four years ago. how have the issues changed in those four years? >> guest: well, it seems like the issues just keep on coming, and they tend to be very major issues affecting both radio and television. but clearly on the radio side, the whole issue of performance rights, performance tax, whatever you want to tribe it as, is an ongoing challenge. hopefully, the day will arrive when both the digital and the terrestrial platform can come up with a model that actually grows music and works for both. but right now one has an unsustainable business model, and the other one works for radio, but on the other hand, we need it to work for the performers too. but if you provide a rate t
. this is true as much of the recent past, as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy, as i learned this time around. first, there are people you have to talk to. [laughter] and while i was blessed from beginning to end from having some passing people to talk to you about joe kennedy, including large numbers of kennedys, i must prefer working from written documents to listen to people talk and try to figure out what's real, what's imagined what they know, what they think they know because someone told them for what they think they know but they don't know at all. the other difficulty about writing about our recent past is that it's not always easy to establish one's distance from it. to construct passion of the past that is so close to us, and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our commonsense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demystify them to move beyond the clichÉd about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of our forefathers. esp
out, the united states of america. our mandate is to report the truth, not what the pio tells us is the truth. even what the cio thinks is the truth. the truth as we can find it. whether it is the time of an easter egg hunt or a national policy. it's america, the land of the free, the land of the free press. and the people that we serve, the people that we are a conduit for, the public of the united states of america has a right to this information. thank you. >> thank you. tony? [laughter] >> it's funny, whenever we have these constitutions, and is they actually happen a lot, you know, i think we look at them in one of two ways. one we just heard, right, is that the public affairs officers are pretty much, you know, obstacles and ill-informed boobs, and reporters are universeally good and have the interest of the public at heart. or it's the opposite, right? is that, you know, reporters are evil scoundrels looking to embarrass public officials and make mockery of the policy making process, and the only thing standing between this evil horde and the print are public affairs offic
this. that is not the way you do things in the united states of america. you have this tremendous natural inclination to think of all the reasons why you can't do it, you have to do it. that is where we were. >> after the swearing-in, in the first few hours or days were there any offices or persons in authority, that this was in fact a done deal? >> i don't -- i think there were some people who came to the capital and next morning who had not seen this on tv, is lee curtis peer? she is one, who showed up for work the next morning and didn't know this had happened and yet the world had turned upside down. >> the perception was the governor -- >> very new short-term receptionist in governor blanton's front office and worked for governor alexander and fortress the government for 30 plus years. >> on that question, one, based on bill koch's advice, i asked the new cabinet members to take their offices that make no decisions between the swearing-in on wednesday and saturday and those decisions could not be challenged later by anybody so we tried to minimize that but the question you as
. thank you and god bless america. >> i think we go we go inside ? >> we have a signing station set in the air conditioning. >> it's in air conditioning. >> those of us in wool are looking forward to the air conditioning. >> you do that. you're the boss. i'm just the passenger. college is nice, isn't it? >> we will take a moment and get ourselves oriented. we are leaving downtown gettysburg. the train will be moving in a westerly direction. >> does this train go parallel to the route that he came down or hill came down? i think so. you may want to get on and explain that at some point or have bill do it. you do have a narration? you may want to have somebody actually do the narration if that makes sense. >> it was just over that hill where the fighting took place very early in the morning july 1, 1863. >> i think either you or bill should give the narration. bill knows vastly more about the details than i do. but it's your train. i will say something general. >> walk through the park. hi, how are you? good. aren't you wa-good. aren't you warm? >> very warm, sir. >> saw you on bill o
on political trips with him in the united states into south and latin america which was very unusual for women in her generation. so she had the wanderlust from the time she was a young girl. she was very proud of the fact that she spoke fluent french and german which he perfected while she was at the content making the best of a bad situation which would become her mantra in life. when she married this was a way to escape both the boisterous mess of the children and perhaps some of the upset over the weaknesses in her marriage and in some ways perhaps was also a form of birth control because of worst the catholic church the catholic church would not have allowed any artificial contraception. >> host: she thought mine was enough. >> guest: she thought mine was enough and in later years she was on the merv griffin show in the early 70's and he brought up that her son bobby and his wife ethel had 11. rose said well if i had known it was a competition i might've had more than nine. >> host: i think it was a bit of a competition. there was one trip where they want to rush on that was unusual for w
in the pool of daca applicants. those from central america, asia and europe on the other hand are underrepresented in the pool of applicants so far and for these three groups this underrepresentation is also statistically significant. so just a reminder here i'm going through sort of the top line findings and this discussion hopefully will unpack some of the receipts why. okay. so we can move beyond national origins and this is where i do apologize because this should have been removed because this is all about stroking academic ego but this is just a multivariant regression analysis. this is a way to take all of the data, analyze the data while controlling for other factors. now, underrepresentation is one thing and new or bolstered outreach to those particular national origin groups can correct that underrepresentation but are all groups experiencing daca sort of equally? well another way we can address that question it look at denials. so when we think about approvals versus denials, we can ask ourselves, are any particular groups disproportionately being denied? so this ma
states and said south and latin america which was very unusual for a. so she had the wanderlust from the time she was a year and grow , very proud -- war of the fact. making the best of the best situation. then once she married is was a way to escape both the bush justice of the children, or have some of the onset of the weaknesses and in some way perhaps also a form of birth control pill is a catholic church would not have allowed any. >> she even maintained her schumer. the early 1970's. if i had known it was a competition and might have had more than nine permit. >> happy to surpass. >> one trip when they went to russia and then it was unusual for women. >> 1937, as of this would have been prior. >> her son in the apple of her eye had guns hang fund. -- the epitome of a capitalist and he said, you need to know the ways of future. socialism may be one of them. absolutely for the year between reps cool and when he went to harvard he went to london to study and then spent some time in the soviet this well fact-finding and would report back. so taken with his report that she decided t
-interest in america's cultural war. she writes on family, feminism, homosexuality, affirmative action and campus political correctness. she helped publish a book entitled radical and chief which was exposing obama's lost years that nobody knows
. and if they dorvisor no, that's important to america's safety and security so what is that this one action you take at that point? >> first i would like to see a source with training and education. we have put together office of training and workforce engagement a very robust, ethics and integrity training program. and also a training program for entire workforce. because that's a we get to an efficient workforce in future, high-performance workforce. we have put together a very substantial required training that all tsos have to go through. >> how do you train -- i'm baffled. how to train one to know to call their supervisor and tell him i'm not going to be a work or i may be late? >> it is commonsense. and i would tell you that we have ethics training. we have integrity training. we have situational training on videos for our people. we're trying to train a workforce of about 47,000 screeners, and they have to do the job and have to be trained. they get in on an annual basis. we distrusted it would but messages. i want to you on the issue of tardiness, you're right. i'm not going to disagree with
and they're shouting at us, australia, with the guns to our heads, we shouted back, no, america, america. i had thrown my passport at them. i was born here in washington, dc and they would kick me in my stomach and as others joined the firing squad i would say, america, america. at some point they took the guns from our heads, we believe because we were from the same country their weapons were from. they would have to pay a price for killing us they never had to pay for killing the timor yeast, a red cross jeep pulled up. we were able to get into it. the driver of the red cross jeep picked up the timorees man who was in a sewer ditch next to us and everytime the soldiers beat him, he would put up his hands in the prayer sign and they would smash the butts of their rifles into this face. we drove as a museum -- human mass to to the hospital. at the hospital, when we got out, the doctors and nurses started to cry when they saw us. ... people can march in streets here, and they saw that that day. and that deepened their despair. we went hiding. we knew we had to get out of the country. we have
of america. he knew what japan was getting into and as he told the individual at the time, he said that we could guarantee a tough fight for the first six months but i have no confidence after that. it is important to know that he is a gambler. he played billiards and roulette and dejong and it almost did not matter what the game was as long as it had a gambling component. he often threatened to resign to become a full-time professional gambler. that is how good he was. although i'm sure they didn't take his threats seriously, it is important to understand that his love of gambling affected his military strategy and influenced his thinking. that is why he has a mixed record. he was a fascinating character, nonetheless. when he was young and serving aboard japan's naval flagship during the japanese and russian war, the deck bluff and he was severely injured by an explosion. if you look at this photograph here, you can see the stars peppering his face from the shrapnel. he was pretty self conscious, which is one reason they were often airbrushed out of his official photographs and he also lo
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